Dive Site: Socorro

Diving Socorro Manta w diver-credit Bonnie Pelnar banner Solmar V

Site Overview

Site Type: Pelagic - manta rays, silky, Galapagos and hammerhead sharks
Location: Socorro, Mexico

Description

The main attraction of diving Socorro Island is the population of giant oceanic manta rays that come regularly to the island’s cleaning stations from November through to June.

Diving Socorro Manta with Diver Bonnie Pelnar Solmar V

Image: with permission from Solmar V

From February to April, expect to see humpback whales and from April to June – schooling hammerheads, while whale sharks are frequently sighted in June and November. All dive sites offer interesting underwater structures of great depth but the vegetation is quite sparse.

Diving-Socorro-whale-shark-001-Nautilus-Liveaboards

Image: with permission from Nautilus Liveaboards

July to October are off season for both tourism and diving in the area – the seas become too rough for sailing and too warm to attract pelagic species, so many liveaboards divert to Guadalupe for the great white shark diving.

Diving Socorro Silky Sharks by Jeremy Cuff credit Solmar V

Image: with permission from Solmar V

There are also common sightings of silky, Galapagos, hammerhead, white tip and silver tip sharks and whale sharks are usually spotted at the beginning of and the latter part of the season. Sailing to Socorro takes 20-26 hours each way, depending on the weather.

Diving Socorro-schooling-hammerheads-001 credit Nautilus Liveaboards

Image: with permission from Nautilus Liveaboards

There are only five dive sites around Socorro Island, with four dived regularly and Cabo Pierce is most popular. Here you’ll find a reef that extends out into the current. Nestle yourself into the boulders to view the large number of pelagic species here.

Diving Socorro Manta with diver-credit Bonnie Pelnar Solmar V

Image: with permission from Solmar V

Roca O’Neal, or Hammerhead Central, is a pinnacle with a plateau at about 10m, where you can basically sit and watch the many shark species pass by in the current. Photographers may also wish to explore the cavern below.