Dive Site: Luncheon Bay Hook Island Whitsundays

Yellow tail fusiliers above soft corals diving luncheon bay hook island at whitsundays queensland australia diveplanit banner

Site Overview

Site Type: Shallow scenic coral reef
Depth: Top: 3MMedian: 9MBottom: 15M
Location: Luncheon Bay is a sheltered bay on the north western corner of Hook Island in the Whitsundays

Description

Luncheon Bay Hook Island has a very pretty reef made up of large bommies with heads of corals on top and steep sides with fans and soft corals down to gullies between each where the bigger fish would disappear. There are reef fish aplenty: damsels, butterflyfish, coralfish, some large Emperor Angels and barramundi cod.

A sole batfish came to welcome us as soon as we backward rolled in; I was expecting a groper but maybe he was just filling in.

Batfish welcome committee diving Luncheon Bay Hook Island at the Whitsundays Queensland Australia by Diveplanit

The highlight was to blue spotted rays mating, at first they were on a sandy bottom and disappeared into a localised fog so frenetic was their activity. But as the female managed to move herself along onto a rocky area we could see the ‘action’ quite clearly.

Blue spotted rays mating diving Whitsundays Queensland Australia by Diveplanit

The variety of coral was probably more interesting than the variety of fish. On the bommie tops was a mixture of corals, with some leather corals just coming out to feed, in various stages from completely smooth, to fully feeding, and some half way between.

Leather coral showing the polyps coming out to feed diving Luncheon Bay Hook Island at Whitsundays Queensland Australia by Diveplanit

One gully was completely covered in a meadow of Xenia

Xenia diving Luncheon Bay Hook Island at the Whitsundays Queensland Australia by Diveplanit

Every type of coral appeared to be out and feeding – it was mid-afternoon and sunny.

Simon with boulder coral diving Luncheon Bay Hook Island at the Whitsundays Queensland Australia by Diveplanit

All the coral crowns on top of the bommies had their community of all blue, or all yellow damsels.

Blue damsels and bicolour chromis diving Luncheon Bay Hook Island at Whitsundays Queensland Australia by Diveplanit

The bigger fish were to be found between the bommies. Often you had to spot which way they were going, sneak the other way around the bommie and grab a shot as soon as they appeared in frame. Most were reasonably wary of divers.

Bleekers parrotfish diving Luncheon Bay Hook Island at the Whitsundays Queensland Australia by Diveplanit

The anemonefish were the shyest fish I have ever encountered. It took a few minutes just to get a glimpse of them!

Shy anemonefish diving Luncheon Bay Hook Island at the Whitsundays Queensland Australia by Diveplanit

Unlike the seastars who can hold a pose for hours while you compose the shot and snap away!

Indian Seastar diving Luncheon Bay Hook Island at the Whitsundays Queensland Australia by Diveplanit

This last one looked so stiff, I can’t imagine him being flexible enough to move very far at all.

Unknown seastar diving Luncheon Bay Hook Island at Whitsundays Queensland Australia by Diveplanit